History and background knowledge

  • “The Council of Europe and Youth”Thirty years of experience (2002)
  • “Exploring the European youth mosaic”The social situation of young people in Europe (2002)
  • “Supporting young people in Europe”Principles, Policy and Practice (2002) volume 1
  • “Supporting young people in Europe”Lessons from the ‘second seven’ Council of Europe international reviews of national youth policy – volume 2
  • “Eggs in a pan”Youth work: Speeches, Writings and Reflections by Peter Lauritzen (2008)
  • “Young people at the Heart of Europe”A decade of the European Youth Centre Budapest (2006)
  • “Compendium of national youth information and counselling structures”in collaboration with ERYICA (2015)
  • “Starting points for combating hate speech online”NO HATE SPEECH MOVEMENT (2012)
  • “Compendium of Council of Europe approaches to key youth policy and youth work issues”
  • “All different – All equal: Cookbook”
  • “How big is your world?”Europe, Youth and Globalisation. An anthology (2005)
  • “Learning from violence”The youth dimension (2004)
  • “Can youth make a difference?”Youth policy facing diversity and change (2002)
Youth Partnership Publications:
  • The history of youth work in Europe, vol. 1. Relevance for today’s youth work policy (2009)
  • The history of youth work in Europe, vol. 2. Relevance for today’s youth work policy (2010)
  • The history of youth work in Europe, vol. 3 (2012)
  • The history of youth work in Europe, vol. 4 (2014)
  • The history of youth work in Europe, vol. 5 (2016)
  • The history of youth work in Europe, vol. 6 (2018)

Access the general link here.

Manuals and handbooks

  • “WE CAN!”Taking action against Hate Speech through Counter and Alternative Narratives
  • “Taking it seriously”
  • “Compass”A manual on Human Rights Education with Young People (2015)
  • CompasitoManual on human rights education for children (2008)
  • “Have your say!”Manual on the Revised European Charter on the Participation of Young People in Local and Regional Life (New Edition) (2015)
  • “Mirrors”Manual on combating antigypsyism through human rights education (2015)
  • “BOOKMARKS”A manual for combating hate speech online through human rights education (2016)
  • BarabaripenYoung Roma speak about multiple discrimination (2014)
  • “Young people’s access to rights through youth information and counsellingToolkit on how to inform young people about their rights (2015)
  • “Right to Remember”A Handbook for Education with Young People on the Roma Genocide (2014)
  • “Youth information Starter Kit”(2010)
  • “Manual for facilitators in non-formal education”(2009)
  • “Gender Matters”A manual on addressing gender-based violence affecting young people (2007)
  • “Companion”A campaign guide about education and learning for change in Diversity, Human Rights and Participation
  • “DOmino”A manual to use peer group education as a means to  fight racism, xenophobia, anti-Semitism, and intolerance, 3rd edition (2005)
  • “Education pack”Ideas, resources, methods and activities for informal intercultural education with young people and adults  (Revised in 2016)

Access the general link here.

National youth policy reviews

An international review of national youth policy is the most complex and comprehensive of measures fostering youth-policy evaluation and development. This process involves wide-ranging commitment, from political to financial, from both the requesting country and the Council of Europe.

The main milestones include the preparation of a national report about the youth policy and situation of young people in the country, an expert team assessment of the report followed by up to two intensive field visits around the country to study particular perspectives, finalisation of the international report further to input from the requesting government, and its presentation at a public hearing.

Access the link here.

OSCE Youth – Resources

OSCE Youth: The OSCE’s commitment to promote the role and the inclusion of youth in its peace and security agenda dates back to its founding document, the Helsinki Final Act, and has been strengthened through many subsequent OSCE decisions. Two consecutive Ministerial Council declarations, in 2014 and 2015, acknowledged the potential of young people to contribute to political, economic and social development and to the OSCE’s work across the three dimensions of its comprehensive concept of security. The Organization puts particular emphasis on youth protection, and on promoting youth participation in areas like preventing and countering violent extremism and radicalization that lead to terrorism, intercultural and interreligious dialogue, education, tolerance and non-discrimination and political participation.

Access the link here.